The Piley Rees field resting between Winter storms and scrutinized  by the Heatlie Pavilion.

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Upper Fields with Woodlands Pavilion

Cemetery, Range and Avenue Fields with the Woodlands Pavilion and The Mitre (OD Union) in the background.

The Piley Rees Field is named for the legendary schoolmaster and rugby coach who had been a master at Bishops from 1922 to 1967. He died in 1975 and the field was named after him in 1983.

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Rick Skeeles Pavilion on Lutgensvale Fields- home of Bishops Prep Rugby

 

The fields on the Top Field – to the right as you come down the Avenue – take their names from what they were next to, The Avenue Field was and still is next to the Avenue. The Range was next to the old shooting range before it was moved to the far side of the Oaks. Parallel and next to the Range is the Cemetery because it was next to the cemetery behind St Thomas’s Church, where the Astroturf now is. When the cemetery was deconsecrated the field was used for rugby and called the Graveyard (now the Astro). The Fields outside – off Riverton Road- of the school in the dip next to the river were once a farm. JW Lutgens acquired the farm in 1799 and so that low-lying part was called Lutgensvale where four fields are in operation. The New Rick Skeeles Pavilion built in honour of Richard Skeeles – the legendary and much loved 1st Team Coach and prep school master.

Lut sunrise

Warming up on the Lutgensvale Fields for the first games- KO 8-00am

 

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  • Why do we play this game?

    Rugby is where a whole life can be trampled into an hour, where the emotions of a lifetime can be felt on a pitch of ground, where a person can suffer then die and rise again. Rugby is a theater where sinners and layabouts can be saints; a common man can become an uncommon hero and champs can become the chumps. It is a place where the past and the future so often fuse with the present. Rugby is singularly able to give us crowning experiences where we feel completely one with the world and transcend all conflicts as we finally become our own potential. ~with apologies to George A. Sheehan.

  • 'I have no doubt that you could pull rugby players out of their many other commitments at this busiest of schools. They could do pillar strength at short break, gym before school, condition during chapel, work on fundamentals and core strength at long break and train every afternoon. We might even beat Gym away. But is that really what we are after?' John Dobson