The Diocesan School of the Diocese of Cape Town – for boys was established in 1849 by Bishop Robert Gray, and opened its doors at Maynier’s Cottage in the grounds of the Bishop’s residence, Protea, now called Bishopscourt. Its object was ‘to give a sound Education to the Youth of the Colony’, conducted on the principles of the English Church. The first Principal, the Revd HM White was an English clergyman. Gray’s clear objective was for this school to be different from the other grammar schools that he founded during his first years in South Africa. He envisaged a lower school (boys aged 10 to 17) and an upper school (boys older than that). In 1874 when the University of the Cape of Good Hope was instituted, university classes were set up as part of the Collegiate School, in line with Gray’s original intentions. As the formal name of the school is quite a mouthful, the school has been referred to as ‘Bishops’ (the school of the Bishop) from the very beginning.

Although it is believed that Bishops may have played cricket from the very start, records of the first thirty or more years have not been preserved. The following extract however, from an article written by Frank Reid in “The History of South African Cricket” edited and compiled by M. W. Luckin does provide some early reference to Bishops Cricket:

Among the first of the shining lights of cricket at ‘Bishops’ was E. A. Judge, a contemporary of the College of the Right Hon. J. X. Merriman. In the year 1859 he had the distinction of putting up what was for those days and those conditions the huge score of 43 against a rival institution. He played the game for many years after leaving College, with great success. In the year 1860 Canon (then Mr.) Ogilvie became Principal of the College. A keen and efficient cricketer, he instilled into his boys a love of the game in its best traditions, and himself for many years played for the College. And so cricket flourished more greatly than before.

Cricket at Bishops has a proud history. Over the years we have produced a number of South African and other international players and our cricket has always ranked amongst the strongest in the country.

Each year Bishops players proudly represent WP schools at the annual inter-provincial cricket week. Three Bishops old boys are still involved in international cricket (Herschelle Gibbs and Craig Kieswetter as players and Adrian Holdstock as an ICC umpire).

Three Bishops old boys are still involved in international cricket (Herschelle Gibbs and Craig Kieswetter as players and Adrian Holdstock as an ICC umpire).

Playing cricket at Bishops is about three things:

  1. The past: Honouring and respecting our rich heritage
  2. Bishops Cricket today: Living in the present, moving with the times and remaining ahead.
  3. The future: Leaving a legacy by providing a sustainable future of excellence.